©2019 by Annika Hirsekorn Impressum

MOVIENDO LA FE
MIGRATING PERSPECTIVES ON VENEZUELA

ALEALONSO | MARTÍN ALLAIS | VALENTINA ALVARADO | ELISA BERGEL MELO | EVA MARINA BURCKHARDT | JOSEJOSÉ | CARLIN DÍAZ | DENIS FANEITES | IVONNE GARGANO | LEONARDO GONZÁLEZ | ROLANDO GONZÁLEZ | LUIS LESTÓN | EDGAR MARTÍNEZ | ANGYVIR PADILLA | VIRGINIA RAMÍREZ | CRISTINA SITJA RUBIO

NEUROTITAN, BERLIN NOVEMBER 2017

 
There are truths that are only true the day after tomorrow – and those that are true at no point in time.
(Carl Gustav Jung, The Relations between the Ego and the Unconscious)


The claim that truth can neither be explained nor defined leads to the assumption that a generally acknowledged consensus for what we hold to be true cannot be established. Our perception of reality works analogously: That we can only ever speak of a known reality, in most cases one constructed by us, precludes the possibility of a “real” reality. But what does the concept of reality mean in a country where apparently only constructed realities are circulated?
Moviendo la Fe (engl. Moving Faith) is a play of words that references the Venezuelan global hit Moliendo Café (engl. Grinding Coffee) and refers to a fundamental debate among the exhibiting artists: Having emigrated mostly to foreign European countries, they are both observers of an economically and socially escalating situation in their home country and confronted with a highly controversially arranged prerogative of interpretation. The artists’ answer to the political frustration at home is to move faith – in people’s heads as well as across borders.
 
The art works on display address the relation between truth and reality, as well as the ascriptions to these concepts, and examine collective (mythic) narratives in view of the current state of Venezuela. The works contribute to a dialogue by reacting to current political developments and the discrepancy between reproduced truth in the (international) media-scape and lived reality of young Venezuelans both at home and abroad. At the same time, ensuing questions regarding nativity, migration and identity in relation to one’s own re-orientation and an increasingly fading memory of the home country are also addressed by the exhibit (Text: Annika Hirsekorn)